HypeBeast interviews Dennis Morris: Bob Marley Photographer & Musical Viewfinder

August 04 2014 . 10:12pm

 

A mastermind behind a camera and a living legend within the music industry, Dennis Morris is a name that resonates beyond barriers of time and genre. An artist in every sense of the word, Morris uses the camera no differently to the way an artist uses a brush, creating and capturing moments in the industry that speak beyond the subject itself and are threaded with messages of social movement and emotion. A photography enthusiast since the age of eight, Morris’s career first kicked off when he skipped school to wait outside Bob Marley’s concert venue in hopes of capturing a shot or two, and within hours he had hopped on the bus as the tour’s photographer. What came next was a ride through the music industry, captured and documented through Morris’s lens as the young photographer worked with everyone from Bob Marley to the Sex Pistols, and eventually extended his creative reach from the camera to official album artwork and more. Peep below for our conversation with the man himself.

How important is visual art to music, and vice versa?

Visual art to music is vital! During the days of vinyl, the record sleeve was an art form. Most sleeves were used as a way of explaining the content of the album – i.e. title of the album.It was vital because back in the days when you went to a record shop, as you went through the racks, the sleeve was what first attracted you to a band/musician if you had never heard of them.

Visit Hypebeast.com / hypetrak.com to read the full article.

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JUXTAPOZ | Jesse Hazelip in Conversation with Judith Supine

July 10 2014 . 07:56am


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Approaching the eerie compound in Jesse’s large white cargo van, we joked about the vehicle’s appearance and how we looked like scrappers. The prison, which consists of several separate buildings, was surprisingly absent of any graffiti or vandalism, despite being unused for a long period of time. Lurking around, taking photos and doodling on walls, the world outside temporarily dissolved and I realized why Jesse had asked me to come. It’s a place for conversation, contemplation and tranquility. The infrastructure included ridiculously tiny cells and was a sobering reminder of America’s highly profitable, inhumane and deeply corrupt incarceration practices, the most prevalent theme in Jesse’s most recent body of work. For this interview, I reached out to Brooklyn-based artist, Judith Supine who’s frequently collaborated with Jesse, creating multiple projects intended solely for the streets. —  Austin McManus

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Judith Supine: How do you define compassion?
Jesse Hazelip: Being able to look at a criminal and love them regardless of their deeds. People in our society are very quick to judge others, especially poor people, based upon their own reality. I’ve been reading a lot about the prison system for my current body of work, and it’s alarming how racist and cruel the current punitive system is. I had a small taste of it the few times that I’ve been in a county jail facility. I was shocked by the inhumane treatment and the obvious racial bias in the population, and I could guess that it was much worse in higher security prisons. My experiences there triggered the need to make art to bring attention to the atrocities silently occurring behind those thick concrete walls.

The book The New Jim Crow by Michelle Alexander has been my bible in researching this series. She worked tirelessly, uncovering blatant racism throughout all levels of our judicial system. Though there are many issues that need examination, I think that there are a few pressing ones that need to be dealt with urgently. The number of prisoners with mental illness is sickening. Prisons are not at all capable of caring for the needs of these individuals. Solitary confinement is another major violation of human rights. This method of incarceration is equivalent to torture, especially when you have prisoners in these conditions for multiple years and sometimes decades. One of the most prevalent issues I have a problem with is the overwhelming number of nonviolent offenders doing serious time for drug charges associated with the ages-old drug war that we’ve been losing for more than 40 years. If we were in Iraq for 40 years, do you think the public would be supportive? We need to take a different approach, obviously.

Find out more at: juxtapoz.com / jessehazelip.com

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Interview: graffiti artist Saber

January 13 2014 . 10:58pm

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Scaling walls sans safety nets at the dead of night, graffiti artists risk life and limb to make their art. But the leap they make from street to gallery is just as tough a challenge in its way: in winning over the art world, they threaten the credibility as authentic outsiders that is their calling card. The consequence is a strange phenomenon: wealthy and successful artists such as Banksy who still slip out with their spray can and cling to their anonymity as a symbol of their rebelliousness.

For Saber, whose show The Ugly American opens at the Outsiders gallery in London’s Soho this week, the situation is a little different. Fired by a sense of social injustice, the Los Angeles-based artist has channelled his energy into a high-profile political activism that has left him nowhere to hide. In 2010, he attracted the opprobrium of the US right – including the wrath of Fox News – when he graffitied the Stars and Stripes in an effort to highlight the injustices of the US healthcare system. (The video he released was used by the US administration as part of its healthcare campaign.) A year later, he caused a sensation when he commissioned light aircraft to write slogans across the LA and New York skies that raged against cuts to the arts and against a new law censoring public murals.

To read the full article please visit: www.ft.com

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Building Detroit – Revok, Nekst, Pose

January 04 2014 . 08:17pm

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Rime’s “Dangerous Joseph Shit” Limited Edition Zine + “Moving Into Now”

December 23 2013 . 11:45pm

Limited Edition Prints Drop Today at 3pm, Exclusively at 1xRUN Monday 12/23 at 3pm EST / 12pm PST

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“My approach on paper is often similar to outdoor pieces: loose, aggressive, and executed with little planning in terms of the end result. I avoid using pencil and go into a white page with light but hold marker strokes or curves, progressively working darker as the piece takes shape. Every stroke is influenced by the tone and energy of the one before it. From an abstract composition as a starting point, I tend to go in with layers of repetitive figurative imagery that go with the flow that is already laid out on the page. The freestyled characters should seem in motion, up to shit in some sort of fashion, often side profile. Text helps to set the mood. I know the work is done with there is enough narrative to tell many layered intersecting stories.” – Rime

1xRUN Thru Interview
Moving Into Now & Dangerous Joseph Shit by Rime

1xRun: Tell us a little bit about the execution “Moving Into Now”, when was this piece created and with what materials?
Rime: “Moving Into Now” was created over a few sessions over a week and a half period back in the summer of 2013 with markers and shit. I worked on it while in New York City and Los Angeles. The original is the same size as the prints here, 18”x24” inches. There is no definite game plan with these type of works. I draw when in the mood and build on whatever is already on the page.

1xRun: What is unique about this piece compared to your other work?
Rime: This piece has elements inspired by my move back to New York City earlier this year. After 8 years out west it’s nice to be back home.
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1xRun: Let’s talk about “Dangerous Joseph Shit” a 60-page limited edition zine that catalogs some of your recent work, tell us about the theme and what people can expect in this zine.
Rime: “Dangerous Joseph Shit” is a compilation of some recent work from the past two years. The aim with the layout is to show the influence graffiti has on my paper work and vice versa.

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1xRun: The idea for “Dangerous Joseph Shit” began as a follow up to your Arrest Sheet portfolios, tell us a bit about why you feel that zines and zine culture are so important to graffiti culture?
Rime: I think zines are a good way to display a portion of work or theme in a non formal way. Growing up in graffiti, collecting magazines and books was always a big deal. With the internet taking over of the documentation of graffiti it seems rare to see graffiti in print and not on a screen.

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1xRun: Why were zines so impactful on you both growing up and recently?
Rime: I’m down with shit I can look at and hold in my hands.

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1xRun: Why should people buy pick up this print and zine pack?
Rime: It will solve all their problems in life.

1xRun: Describe this print and zine in one gut reaction word.
Rime: Snafu.

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1xRun: Where else can people find you?
Jersey Joe: WebsiteFacebook Instagram + Twitter @jerseyjoeism – Seventh Letter

For mor information visit: 1xrun.com

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