Huffington Post | Jesse Hazelip’s “Mark of Cain” at Known Gallery Highlights Prison Injustice

November 16 2014 . 04:50pm

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With his first solo Los Angeles show, “Mark of Cain,” artist Jesse Hazelip confronts injustice with a powerful weapon, his art. Hazelip addresses issues surrounding the United States’ increasingly privatized prison system with beautiful, profound, deeply symbolic art that combines delicate pencil and pen drawings with elements of graffiti and tattooing. Born in Cortez, Colorado where he lived amidst the Ute and Navajo Nation, Jesse moved to Santa Barbara when he was 13 and got involved in the graffiti scene, developing his art skills, then graduating from Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, CA with a BFA. Transitioning into galleries, he continues to use wheat paste and paint public space, running his own “ad campaigns” with graffiti and posters to reach as many free minds as possible.

Read the rest of the feature on Jesse Hazelip at: huffingtonpost.com

JESSE HAZELIP / MARK OF CAIN
Opening reception: November 1, 2014 | 8-11p
On view: November 1 – 15, 2014 Show is extended until the 21st due to high interest. 

Known Gallery
441 North Fairfax Avenue
Los Angeles, CA 90036
info@knowngallery.com

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KRUSH | LAndmarked featured in Huffington Post

April 29 2014 . 09:03pm

LAndmarked: A Nostalgic view of Los Angeles
By: Rodrigo Ribera D’Ebre

 

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This past Saturday at The Seventh Letter Gallery, Paul “Krush,” Meraz, a member of world-renowned graffiti crews MSK and AWR, and art collective The Seventh Letter, launched an exhibition of historical landmarks throughout the city of Los Angeles. Like the rest of us who drive all over the city and county like drifters going nowhere and somewhere simultaneously, we often neglect places of significance. However, as Krush began to take more notice of signage and typography of very specific places based on rendezvous points or frequency, he soon realized a sense of loss for the 20th century that is now becoming a fading memory. In today’s highly digitized world where the latest smart phone is replaced months later by a newer, better, or more efficient product, we often romanticize an era where life seemed easier and more slow-placed. Some of the signs can’t ever be replicated, although many locations try to architecturally create a throwback vintage sign for aesthetic purposes, because of their art-deco or streamline moderne fashion, such as the fonts and bright vivid colors that were era-specific. But, as you continue to drive around Los Angeles and pay closer attention, you too might notice the distant memory and affinity for a place you probably didn’t know existed.

In LAndmarked, the exhibition covers a specific spectrum and palette which creates a cohesive façade. These colors are radiant and soothing, and can even represent a climatic warmth of the Los Angeles topography. The volition of colors are meant to compliment the color scheme of the landmarks where the backdrops maintain wide brush strokes and proportional lines that give it depth and texture. These artistic choices are subtleties, which is metaphoric for life’s subtleties in general. Some of the landmarks include: Sam’s Hof Brau, Cole’s, Hop Louie, and Felix Chevrolet. If you grew up in Los Angeles, these are places you might have always remembered or visited yourselves, but in the ever-changing landscape of the metropolis, these places could be gone tomorrow and most wouldn’t notice. It is Krush’s dedication to landmark preservation, something he learned to appreciate from studying graphic design, drawing, typography and graffiti that inspired this exhibition.

His artistic career dates back to the mid 80s at the heyday of graffiti, commuting between Orange County and the San Fernando Valley. This was a time when crew members pushed each other competitively to bring out the best in skill and creativity, something that led to graphic design and an idea that still resonates today. LAndmarked is the beginning of a series of paintings that will capture the nostalgic essence of historical Los Angeles through the perspective of this young artist who maintains a strong connection to the cityscape via signage. The show runs from April 26th – May 10th, 2014 at the Seventh Letter Gallery where other exhibition pieces are available such as t-shirts, prints, and glassware. Don’t forget to get out there and always support your local artists that work feverishly to provide us with different ways of looking at the ecology of our environment.

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HUFFINGTON POST | Street Artist Judith Supine And ‘Arrested Development’ Actress Alia Shawkat Team Up For Exhibition

September 14 2013 . 08:15pm

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Only in Los Angeles could a street artist and a television star team up for an art exhibition that is legitimately worth seeing.

The unlikely art show, called “Thanks For Nothing,” features miniatures and large scale paintings from street artist Judith Supine along with Alia Shawkat’s dark humored multimedia drawings. A biting electricity aligns the two disparate artists, whether a streak of neon in Supine’s tiny collages or a sarcastic commentary in Shawkat’s scrawled characters.

Supine’s series explores the hypnotic, even spiritual powers hidden in the banal aspects of contemporary American life. Supine, a street art scavenger who describes himself as “pastiche of lost and found,” combines sacred and profane aspects of American culture with little breathing room between. From cigarette boxes to lottery scratch cards, the weight of certain American staples becomes almost divine, if only for a short time, before the remains of are lost or discarded. Supine created over 80 miniature collages, using throwaway materials like dirty magazines and lotto tickets with grand ideas of race, sex and death.

The project space contains new work by Shawkat, a self-taught artist mostly known for her sense of humor onscreen. Shawkat’s caustic wit translates smoothly onto her frantically paced drawings, which combine acerbic squiggly narratives and flowing color washes. Harnessing universal human conditions of shame, rage and insecurity through bizarre and absurd channels, Shawkat proves that the more horrific a situation, the funnier it is.

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Huffington Post features Pat Riot and Bill Barminski | Out of Left Field

May 30 2013 . 06:44pm

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Huffington Post | Sesame Street Art Exhibition Benefits City of Hope

April 27 2012 . 07:59pm

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